Be Disruptive; Subvert the cliché to Stand Out

Subvert the cliché to stand out

Subvert the cliché to stand out

What are your guilty clichés?

Every industry has its clichés.

Six of one, half a dozen of the other.

He was as mad as hell.

Weak as a kitten, strong as an ox.

At the end of the day….

Clichés are shorthand

They show us that we have a shared language, and understanding.

They are grounded in shared experience and that means they are shared over time.

But time bleaches words of meaning. Words left open to the light from repeated exposure lose their vividness and colour.

The danger of the cliché is that we give our audience permission to zone-out.

When our audience can anticipate our trajectory, we give them permission to get comfortable. That’s not entirely a bad thing. If I turned up for a corporate presentation in my pyjamas, there would need to be a compelling reason, and it would need to be tied to a theme in order for it to make sense. If I didn’t, I would run the risk of being so disruptive that nobody would pay much attention to what I was saying.

That said, we so often run in a default mode of repeating the familiar that we lose the opportunity to be fresh.

“time passed like ivory beads on a black thread” – John Hawkes, Travesty

“a stately ice pudding of a cloud” – Patrick White, A Fringe of Leaves

“[The] city lay curled up below like an animal infested with electric lights” – Angela Carter, Several Perceptions

We have so many tools at our disposal to engage an audience, why leave it to the poets and the writers to create something fresh?

Clichés are not just our words, but our actions

Must every presentation be at the front of the room?

Are we doing the same things all of our competitors are?

Think about the kinds of clichés that are in your industry, and avoid them….like the plague.

What are the clichés you are guilty of using the most?

What one clichéd way of doing things can you change this week?

Accent on Accent

Can you change your accent?

Can you learn a language? If you can learn a language, you can refine those language skills even further.

Remember the beginning stages of learning a new language, and how hard it was to make unusual sounds? Refining pronunciation follows the same process you’ve already been through to master the sounds you have now.

Why do we have an accent when we speak another language?

Each language has a set of linguistic habits. When we learn another language, this information passes through the filter of language habits we are accustomed to using. One example in Spanish is the single ‘r’ and the rolled ‘rr’ sound. Many English speakers have trouble rolling the r sound, as it is not part of the language. But in Spanish, the difference between having that sound, is the difference between pero- (but) and perro- (dog).

Although there is room for misunderstanding, the important thing to remember is to focus on an adequate level of communication.

When we get to business communication and positions of leadership, it can help to get a linguistic ‘tune up.’ Especially if the work requires presentations to groups.

How do we work on clarifying accent?

  • Working on a few key words or phrases. Each language group has similar difficulties around pronouncing certain words and sounds in English.
  • Understanding how the words are being formed in your mouth. You can investigate this for yourself on youtube, or work with a coach on how you are forming your sounds.
  • Get feedback and practise. If you have the right information, and you practise, it is inevitable that you will improve.

The good news on accents

In our international age, a lot of people speak more than one language. So long as we can communicate clearly, we can easily engage an audience.

There’s some interesting information in the book, Compelling People that some accents are perceived as warmer or stronger than others. The examples used are the perceived strength of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘I’m back.’  If you imagine his Terminator character with a more melodic or rounded vowel accent, say French, or Italian, it might sound quite different.

The main point to consider when we’re speaking a second language:

Are we being understood?

In all of our communication we want to make it easy for our audience.

Easy to listen, easy to be engaged, easy to respond.

If you’re getting feedback that some of your words are difficult to understand, with a little feedback, it’s easy to improve.